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Nieuwsbrief 22 nr. 4: Uit de vakpers

ASTROLOGICAL JOURNAL mei/juni 2017

Volatile redheads and Mars. In 1988, research astrologers Judith A. Hill and Jacalyn Thompson published the results of a statistical study simply titled ‘Mars and Redheads’, the Astrology News Service reminds us. In their “study of 500 redheads, the astrologers found 136 redheads (or 27.2%) had Mars within 30° of the Ascendant, which was significantly higher than the percentage found for the randomised control groups. Among non-redheads, the percentage dropped off significantly to 16.9% and 19.4%. The researchers calculated the odds at a million-to-one against the likelihood [that] this result occurred by chance”.
Wil je meer lezen, ga dan naar de website van de ANS. Via deze link kom je direct bij het artikel. Hier wordt ook de studie van astrologisch onderzoeker Kenneth McRitchie vermeld.

ASTROLOGICAL JOURNAL maart/april 2017

Terry Mac Kinnell, Whole Signs and the Mars Effect. Back in the mid-Fifties, Michel Gauquelin suggested that a statistically significant number of sports champions were born just after the planet Mars rises or culminates. However, amid various objections and controversies, many astrologers questioned the anomaly of why (in a Placidus-based system) the 12th house was the principal location of Mars, with the 9th showing a secondary peak – after all, neither house is directly associated with sport or physical accomplishment. In accordance with astrological lore, the 1st house [the body] and 10th house [accomplishment] would be more appropriate.
Terry MacKinnell (who practises Vedic-Western fusion astrology) has put forward a possible corrective to Gauquelin's work on his website. He proposes that if the traditional Whole Signs house system is applied to the Mars Effect, the planet peak in the 1st and l0th houses, in Vedic as well as Western astrology. He describes Whole Signs as “the original house system of the Hellenistic astrologers who invented modern horoscopic astrology used in both the West and India, though the Indians use a different zodiac. [It] is radically different to Ascendant-based house systems such as Placidus”.
MacKinnell writes that though there is no absolute proof that his approach is the right one, there is “strong circumstantial evidence” that Whole Signs helps to make better sense of Gauquelin's Mars Effect according to standard astrological principles. His research is still ongoing.

Chris Brennan, auteur van Hellenistic Astrology (zie over hem het volgende item) zegt het volgende over het huizensysteem teken = huis: “Each time astrology was transmitted from one language to another or one culture to another, it changed a bit. Some techniques were lost, while others were added. Until twenty or thirty years ago astrologers in the West didn’t even know the Whole Sign house system existed as an approach that one could use to house division… ten years ago when I would give a lecture and ask how many people in the room knew what the Whole Sign house system was or how it was calculated almost no one would raise their hand… However, we know now that this was in fact the predominant form of house division that was used in the vast majority of the surviving birth charts for nearly the first one-thousand years of the Western tradition. There is clearly something kind of striking about that, even from a purely historical standpoint…One of the things that you have to remember is that the astrological tradition has never been static, but it has always been growing and changing in different ways, even in ancient times”.

ASTROLOGICAL JOURNAL juli/augustus 2017

Interview met Chris Brennan, auteur van Hellenistic Astrology: the study of fate and fortune. Chris Brennan schreef gedurende 10 jaar aan zijn ellenistic Astrology. Op grond van het interview en de boekrecensie in de Astrological Journal van juli/aug 2017 lijkt dit een uitermate gedegen boek (bijna 700 bladzijden). Hij trok een tijd op met de mensen achter het ‘Hindsight-project’. Het boek begint met een zeer uitgebreide beschrijving van de geschiedenis en filosofie van de vroege astrologie. Het zou een basis voor onderzoek kunnen geven. Een paar citaten uit het interview:

“…the realisation that the origins and rationale for most of the basic techniques and concepts that astrologers have taken for granted for the past 2,000 years were available in the Hellenistic texts (…)
(…) in the first third of the book I provide an overview of the history of Hellenistic astrology, and I talk about the texts that have survived from that tradition and what we know about hem, in order to contextualise the techniques that I present later in the work (…)
(…) Broadly speaking, what is usually called ‘traditional astrology’ today can probably best be defined as the type of astrology that was practised in the West from approximately the first century BCE through the 17th century CE. Traditional astrology can be subdivided into three broad traditions, which we will call 1) Hellenistic astrology, 2) Medieval astrology, and 3) Renaissance astrology. Most of the techniques of traditional astrology originated in the Hellenistic tradition, and then some of them were passed on through translations of Hellenistic texts to the Medieval tradition. Eventually some of those techniques were passed on through translations of Medieval-era texts to the Renaissance tradition (…)
(…) that Hellenistic astrology is much more oriented towards natal astrology, and it really excels at that, whereas Renaissance astrology seems to be much more oriented towards and stronger in the realm of horary astrology (…)
(…) The revival of traditional astrology went backwards over the past thirty years, starting with Lilly and some of his contemporaries from the 17th century because their texts were written in English, then eventually the Medieval tradition also became popularised, since there are more astrologers who know Latin than ancient Greek. The third stage now is the full revival and popularisation of the Hellenistic tradition, most of the surviving texts from the Hellenistic tradition have now been translated into modern languages (…)
(…) Until recently astrologers didn’t know that something like a Saturn return could be experienced differently based on whether the native was born during the day or at night(…)
(…) Each time astrology was transmitted from one language to another or one culture to another, it changed a bit. Some techniques were lost, while others were added (…)
(…) Until twenty or thirty years ago astrologers in the West didn’t even know the Whole Sign house system existed as an approach that one could use to house division (…)
(…) ten years ago when I would give a lecture and ask how many people in the room knew what the Whole Sign house system was or how it was calculated almost no one would raise their hand(…)
(…) However, we know now that this was in fact the predominant form of house division that was used in the vast majority of the surviving birth charts for nearly the first one-thousand years of the Western tradition. There is clearly something kind of striking about that, even from a purely historical standpoint (…)
(…) One of the things that you have to remember is that the astrological tradition has never been static, but it has always been growing and changing in different ways, even in ancient times. Many of the great periods in the history of astrology in which the practice flourished often coincided with translation movements, where older forms of astrology would be revived and then synthesised with whatever the prevailing astrological paradigms were at time”.
 
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